Experimental therapy crosses blood-brain barrier to treat neurological disease

Experimental therapy

Experimental therapy crosses blood-brain barrier to treat neurological disease.

Researchers have overcome a major challenge to treating brain diseases by engineering an experimental molecular therapy that crosses the blood-brain barrier to reverse neurological lysosomal storage disease in mice.

The scientists assembled the large molecular agents by merging part of a fatty protein called apolipoprotein E (apoE) with a therapeutic lysosomal enzyme called a-L-idurondase (IDUA).

The blood-brain barrier is a physiological blockade that alters the permeability of tiny blood vessels called capillaries in the brain. Its purpose is to protect the brain by preventing certain drugs, pathogens and other foreign substances from entering brain tissues. The barrier has also been a persistent roadblock to treating brain disease with drugs.