Category Archives: Health

Information and useful news to keep your brain and body in good health. Interesting articles about psychology, latest discoveries, brain health, interesting facts, nutrition, IQ, memory, etc. Different professionals and specialists help us understand health and how to take care of ourselves.

Einstein’s brain: It was better than yours.

Einstein’s brain: It was better than yours.

Albert Einstein’s brain was “unlike those of most people,” according to a new study led by Florida State University evolutionary anthropologist Dean Falk. “Although the overall size and asymmetrical shape of Einstein’s brain were normal. The prefrontal, somatosensory, primary motor, parietal, temporal and occipital cortices were extraordinary,” lead author Falk says.

This is your brain on freestyle rap

This is your brain on freestyle rap.

Using brain scans, scientists try to find the hallmark of a creative process.

In the worldwide cultural juggernaut that is hip-hop, it’s widely understood that the spontaneous lyrical improvisation of freestyle rap is the genre’s purest form of creation. More often than not, how well a rapper navigates this stream-of-conscious realm is the yardstick by which talent is measured.

What Happens To The Aging Brain

Deterioration of the brain sneaks up on most of us. The first clue might be hearing loss, especially in the higher frequencies. We may be forced into bifocals, even trifocals.

But the most serious signs of deterioration occur in the brain. As we age, our reflexes slow. We walk and act slower. We even talk slower. Our memory starts to fail, such as the short-term memory ability that is so crucial for learning new things.

Brain gene pushed humans past apes

Brain gene pushed humans past apes.

An international team of researchers led by Scottish scientists says it has discovered a gene that helps explain how humans evolved from chimpanzees. The gene, called miR-941, appears to have played a crucial role in human brain and cognitive development and may shed light on how humans learned to use tools and language, the University of Edinburgh reported

Brain waves transformed into music

Brain waves transformed into music.

Naturally, our brain activity waxes and wanes. When listening, this oscillation synchronizes to the sounds we are hearing.

Researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Human Cognitive and Brain Sciences have found that this influences the way we listen. Hearing abilities also oscillate and depend on the exact timing of one’s brain rhythms. The discovery that sound, brain, and behaviour are so intimately coupled will help us to learn more about listening abilities in hearing loss.

How the Internet is shaping our “global brain”

How the Internet is shaping our “global brain”.

The South Africans have a beautiful philosophy called Ubuntu, which translates as “I am what I am because of who we all are.” This is a perfect way to think about the way a brain and our cognition develops, influenced by its surrounding people and experiences. It’s also how we should think about the way the Internet is developing, and about the way our choices in how we use technology are shaping this global brain. For both the brain and the Internet, networks are always binding us in new ways and changing our understanding of who we are and how we perceive the world. If we believe that the Internet comparatively is in the same critical stage of early development as a child, making as many connections as possible, then we need to be mindful of how we’re building its foundation.

High blood pressure may cause harmful brain changes in people as young as 40

High blood pressure may cause harmful brain changes in people as young as 40, a study suggests.

In the report, published online Nov. 2 in Lancet Neurology, researchers measured blood pressure in 579 men and women whose average age was 39, then examined their brains with magnetic resonance imaging. After adjusting for smoking, hypertension treatment and total cranial volume, they found that higher systolic blood pressure — the most common form of hypertension — was associated with decreases in gray matter volume and significant injury to white matter. Moreover, there was a dose-response relationship: The higher the blood pressure, the greater the visible changes.

Meditation makes lasting change in brain

Meditation makes lasting change in brain.

A new study has found that participating in an 8-week meditation brain training program can have measurable effects on how the brain functions even when someone is not actively meditating. In their report in the November issue of Frontiers in Human Neuroscience, investigators at Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH), Boston University (BU), and several other research centers also found differences in those effects based on the specific type of meditation practiced.

Your unconscious brain can do math, process language

Your unconscious brain can do math, process language.

The unconscious brain may not be able to ace an SAT test, but new brain research suggests that it can handle more complex language processing and arithmetic tasks than anyone has previously believed. According to these findings, just published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, we may be blithely unaware of all the hard work the unconscious brain is doing.

Human brain Is wired for harmony

Human brain Is wired for harmony.

Many creatures, such as human babies, chimpanzees, and chicks, react negatively to dissonance—harsh, unstable, grating sounds. Since the days of the ancient Greeks, scientists have wondered why the ear prefers harmony. Now, scientists suggest that the reason may go deeper than an aversion to the way clashing notes abrade auditory nerves; instead, it may lie in the very structure of the ear and brain, which are designed to respond to the elegantly spaced structure of a harmonious sound.

Memory could be the most malleable and trainable cognitive function

A new study presented today at the annual meeting of the Society of Neuroscience in New Orleans, Louisiana shows that improved working memory function, following the use of CogniFit online brain training platform, may not only be more malleable, but could also be even more trainable that other cognitive functions.

The research, conducted in collaboration with CogniFit, the Department of Psychology of Northwestern University (Dr. K.L. Gigler), the Department of Psychology of the University of Notre Dame (Dr. K. Blomeke) and the department of Psychiatry of Northwestern University (Dr. S. Weintraub & Dr. P.J. Reber) showed that older adults demonstrated improvements on tests of working memory and language, as well as on a composite measure of processing speed.

Participants to the study where older adults, both healthy and with MCI (mild cognitive impairment) and completed an online cognitive training protocol and memory exercise using the CogniFit brain fitness system. Participants, and especially those with memory impairments, further showed improvement on a battery of real world-like assessments.

Dr. Evelyn Shatil, Head of Cognitive Science at CogniFit explains “This new research demonstrates once again the capacity of the CogniFit’s computerized cognitive training to effectively train specific cognitive abilities. What is interesting in this case, is to see that memory, and working memory, more specifically, seems to be one of the best candidate for cognitive training and brain plasticity exercises.”

The most recent studies in neuroscience demonstrate that scientifically validated cognitive training (leveraging brain plasticity) is one of the very few proven ways to improve cognitive skills. These new results should encourage older adults to engage in brain fitness and improve their cognitive abilities and memory.