What Are The Best Positions To Sleep During Pregnancy: Insomnia During The First Trimester Of Pregnancy

 

We’ve already talked about some of the causes of insomnia during the first trimester of pregnancy and suggested some easy remedies. But what happened when these sleeping problems are caused by discomfort or pains from the pregnancy? What can we do when we can’t get comfortable to sleep?

I’m assuming that some readers, before getting pregnant, were used to sleeping on your stomach or back… two of the positions that can be uncomfortable or cause problems during pregnancy. If you’re wondering what are the best positions to sleep during pregnancy and want to finally get some shut-eye, keep reading.

We’ll talk about some of the best positions to sleep during pregnancy, and we’ll review some of the ways to help you sleep before getting in bed. You can do it! You’ll see that with a little bit of patience, you’ll be able to overcome the insomnia that usually comes during the first trimester of pregnancy.

What are the best positions to sleep during pregnancy?

What are the best positions to sleep during pregnancy?

Getting ready to get in bed during the first trimester of pregnancy

Pillows can be a life-saver to help you get comfortable. You can use a body pillow or put together a few pillows if you don’t have one big one. Putting a pillow between your knees and under your tummy will help relieve some tension in your back and legs.

Avoid drinking water before getting in bed. You do need to stay hydrated during pregnancy, but if you drink right before getting in bed (30 minutes), you’ll have to get up at night to go to the bathroom.

Heartburn or acid reflux may also be a problem when you’re getting ready for bed, so try to have dinner a few hours before going to sleep, and don’t eat anything before getting in bed. Try to avoid spicy foods, they’ll make the heartburn worse and may wake you or keep you up. Elevate your head on a few pillows, it may help your digestion. As you can see, pillows are your best friend during pregnancy.

What are the best positions to sleep during pregnancy?

Best positions to sleep during pregnancy

Insomnia during the first trimester of pregnancy: What are the best positions to sleep during pregnancy?

Try to sleep on your left side. This will help your blood pressure and make sure your baby gets all of the oxygen and nutrients that it needs. Specialists also recommend that you sleep on this side because it’ll help you fall asleep during your pregnancy.

To sleep in this position, you can put a pillow between your legs, another one under your tummy, and one behind your back.

You can also sleep on your left side in a three-quarter position: Lay down on your left side, put your inner arm behind you and your inner leg straight down. As far as your top leg, bend it and put a pillow underneath. Bend your top arm, and put a pillow behind your head.

If you’re uncomfortable in this position, try it on your right side. The left side is generally more comfortable for pregnant women, but there is no problem if you sleep on the other side.

During the first few weeks of pregnancy you can also sleep on your back because your uterus hasn’t extended yet, so it won’t cause any pressure to the vena cava, which carries blood to your heart. If you want to sleep like this for the first few weeks, put a pillow under your thighs and allow your feet and legs lean towards one side.

In the second trimester of pregnancy, sleeping like this may cause less dizziness and nausea. Sleeping on your tummy after the first trimester isn’t a good idea. Many women feel comfortable sleeping like this, but once your uterus starts expanding, this position may be dangerous for the baby, so try to sleep on your side.

When you’re getting ready to sleep, you need to remember that the baby needs to be comfortable, too. If your in a position that isn’t good for the baby, it may be uncomfortable and wake you up kicking. Sleeping on your side will help with that. Being comfortable and sleeping well is very important while you’re pregnant, so try to follow these suggestions so you and your baby can sleep better.

Molly is a writer specialized in health and psychology. She is passionate about neuroscience and how the brain works, and is constantly looking for new content from interesting sources. Molly is happy to give or take advice, and is always working to educate and inspire.

This post is also available in: Spanish