Penguin Explorer: CogniFit's Exciting New Brain Training Game

Penguin Explorer: CogniFit’s Exciting New Brain Training Game

Keeping up with our mission to continually release fun and challenging new content for our users, we are excited to announce the release of a brand-new brain game: Penguin Explorer.

With the hot summer months just around the corner for most of us, this exciting puzzle game is the perfect way to keep your mind off the heat while stimulating spatial perception ability.

Penguin Explorer is a fun new puzzle game.

About the game

Penguin Explorer is a great way to exercise and challenge your brain while helping the fun little penguin clear the snow while avoiding obstacles.

The aim of the game is to help the penguin remove snow from all of the tiles on the map as quickly as possible by sliding along the ice. But be careful to not run into any obstacles along the way!

As the game progresses, the maps get bigger, more complex, and you have to keep your quick wits if you want to clear the board before time runs out. Try to plan each move as quickly as possible to clear the snow from the whole map.

The science behind the game

This exciting puzzle game is based on popular maze-like puzzles with a long history dating back over 50 years.

CogniFit’s team of designers developed Penguin Explorer as a fun twist on this genre of games and created a game that challenges not only the user’s special perception like typical maze games, but also inhibition and planning cognitive abilities.

Let’s take a look at these important cognitive abilities that Penguin Explorer helps stimulate:

Spatial Perception

Spatial perception is the ability to be aware of your relationships with the environment around you (exteroceptive processes) and with yourself (interoceptive processes).

Spatial awareness is made up of two processes, the exteroceptive, which creates representations about our space through feelings, and interoceptive processes, which create representations about our body, like its position or orientation. Space is what surrounds us: objects, elements, people, etc. Space also makes up part of our thinking, as it is where we join all of our experiences. In order to get proper information about the characteristics of our surroundings, we use two systems.

Inhibition

Inhibition is one of our most used cognitive functions. It is how the brain corrects behavior. Inhibition is what makes it possible for us to stay quiet when you want to say something, but know that you shouldn’t, it’s what helps you stay quiet and seated when you’re in class, it’s what helps you stay safe when someone merges into your lane without using their blinker, and it’s what helps you study or work, even when you get bored or want to get up.

Inhibition allows you to react to unforeseen or risky situations safely and quickly. Well-developed inhibition or inhibitory control can help improve behavior and make it possible to perform better academically, at work, on the road, and with friends.

Planning

Planning is a fundamental cognitive skill that forms part of our executive functions. Planning can be defined as ability to “think about the future” or mentally anticipate the right way to carry-out a task or reach a specific goal. Planning is the mental process that allows us to choose the necessary actions to reach a goal, decide the right order, assign each task to the proper cognitive resources, and establish a plan of action.

How to play the game

Penguin Explorer is a deceptively simple puzzle game. Move the penguin up, down, left, or right along the paths, clearing snow from each tile the penguin crosses.

But even penguins, who live in the ice and snow, have trouble stopping on the ice. Each time you move, the penguin will travel along the ice until they run into a wall, so be careful to not slide the penguin into one of the many obstacles on the board!

Try to clear the board as quickly as possible and collect treasures along the way for bonus points!

Conclusion

Playing games like CogniFit’s Penguin Explorer stimulates a specific neural activation pattern. Repeatedly playing and consistently training this pattern helps neural circuits reorganize and recover weakened or damaged cognitive functions.

Now seems like a perfect time to play this fun and exciting puzzle game—and train some of the most important cognitive abilities at the same time!