Preparing the brain for a stroke before it occurs

 

Preparing the brain for a stroke before it occurs

Preparing the brain for a stroke before it occurs.

Priming the brain to sprout new blood vessels before a stroke occurs could reduce the severity and improve the patients’ chances of recovering afterward, according to new research.

“They might still get the stroke, but it’s only half as bad and they may in fact recover,” said Jeff Dunn, Director of the Experimental Imaging Center at the University of Calgary. “I think that’s pretty exciting.”

Fifteen million people suffer a stroke globally each year according to the World Health Organization, leaving many permanently disabled, or worse. Stroke occurs when fats or blood clots clog a mid-sized blood vessel, restricting blood flow, oxygen and nutrients to our sensitive gray and white matter. If the blockage lasts long enough, brain cells can start to die.