What is Depression and How Does It Affect Us?

 

Everyone has felt sad before, but if it’s something that lasts for more then a few weeks you may be suffering from clinical depression. What is depression? Depression is a problems that affects somone both physically and mentally, and may cause anxiety, insomnia, loss of appetite, and feelings of loneliness.

Clinical depression is a feeling of constant sadness that makes you feel useless, powerless, and hopeless. Luckily, depression is a disorder that can be treated with the help of a specialist. With the proper therapy, a person with depression can work to overcome their problems and take back their life.

What is depression

What is Depression: Factors

Depression can affect anyone and may be caused by many different factors. You may fall into a depression after going through an emotionally straining time, like losing a loved one, a break-up, or being let go at work.

This disorder may also be caused by the sum of seemingly unimportant factors, but that little by little chip away at our emotions. Working at a job you don’t like, having problems relating to other people, or feeling like you don’t fit in are some of these factors that may cause you to feel depressed.

Some other things that may cause depression are: the use of certain medications, genetic and hereditary factors, serious physical or mental illnesses, and the abuse of drugs or alcohol. There may also be unexplainable reasons for the onset of clinical depression.

What is Depression: How it Present Itself

Depression presents itself differently in everyone. One person may have all the classic symptoms of depression (fatigue, constant sadness, anxiety, insomnia, etc.), while others may only have some symptoms. This is why it is so important to seek professional help and get personalized treatment, especially if you see that your depression is affecting your everyday life.

Trying to fight these problems with the use of drugs and alcohol instead of getting proper help will only make the situation worse. The most important thing is to accept the problem and decide to fight it with discipline, the help of close friends, and possible medication prescribed by a medical professional.

Molly is a writer specialized in health and psychology. She is passionate about neuroscience and how the brain works, and is constantly looking for new content from interesting sources. Molly is happy to give or take advice, and is always working to educate and inspire.

This post is also available in: Spanish French German

One comment